Blue Blood

Blue Blood

Book - 2004
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Penguin Putnam
The life of a New York City police officer, with the NYPD running through his veins: a highly anticipated nonfiction epic-destined to be a classic.

The excitement began from the moment of its acquisition in the fall of 1998, when major news organizations, including The New York Times, reported the sale of a book by the NYPD officer who wrote the "Cop's Diary" in The New Yorker, under the pseudonym Marcus Laffey.

Now delivered, Blue Blood is a bona fide literary masterpiece, an important book about what it means to protect, to serve, and to defend among the ranks of New York's finest. Conlon's canvas is great and complicated-he is the product of generations involved in law enforcement, good cops and bad-and the story he tells is impossibly rich: it presents an anecdotal history of New York through its police force, and paints a vivid portrait of the teeming street life of the city in all its horror and splendor. It is a story about fathers and sons, partners who become brothers, old ghosts and undying legacies. Here you will see terms like loyalty, commitment, and honor come alive, in action, on a daily basis. With brio and a thrilling literary style, Conlon depicts his life on the force-from his first days walking a beat in the South Bronx to his ascent to detective. The pace is relentless, the stories hypnotic, the scope nothing less than grand.

Edward Conlon is a son of the Bronx, who still lives and works there. His father was a police officer who left the NYPD to join the FBI. His uncle was a lifelong officer of the NYPD. His great grandfather was a crooked cop-a dandy who "carried the bag on Atlantic Avenue"-during the Tammany Hall era. Blue Blood brings together a gifted writer with a subject he owns: Conlon captures the exquisite detail, the hilarious exchange of dialogue, the tragic and the marvelous, experienced firsthand, day after day. He has the Irish gift of storytelling, an old-school delivery, a killer sense of irony, and a sentimental heart. Conlon's father envisioned bigger things for his son, the Harvard graduate; but to Conlon, there is no greater job in the world. He answered the call. In the end, you know why he's a cop, why anyone becomes a cop. Without question, Blue Blood will be one of the most talked about and celebrated books of the year.

Baker & Taylor
A portrait of life as a police officer in the NYPD chronicles the author's life as a cop, from growing up with a police officer father, to his first day on the beat in the South Bronx and to his rise to detective.

Blackwell North Amer
Blue Blood is an work of nonfiction about what it means to protect, to serve, and to defend among the ranks of New York's finest. Edward Conlon is fourth generation NYPD - and the story he tells is an anecdotal history of New York through its police force, and depicts a portrait of the teeming street life of the city in all its horror and splendor. It is a story about fathers and sons, partners who become brothers, old ghosts and undying legacies. Here you will see terms like loyalty, commitment, and honor come to life, in action, on a daily basis. Conlon depicts his life on the force - from his first days walking a beat in the South Bronx, to his ascent to detective.
The book opens with Conlon's first day on patrol, but in fact his story begins in the time of his great-grandfather, an officer of dubious integrity who participated in the corruption that marked the Tammany-era NYPD as a corps in need of reform; it continues through the experience of Conlon's father, a World War II officer who left the ranks of the NYPD to become an FBI agent, and the years of his uncle, an old-fashioned, easygoing career cop, who stayed in uniform throughout the political upheavals and corrections of the 1960s and 1970s. Conlon joined the NYPD during the Giuliani administration, when New York City saw its crime rate plummet but also witnessed events that would alter the city and its inhabitants, and its police force, forever: polarizing racial cases, the proliferation of the drug trade, and the events of September 11, 2001, and its aftermath. Conlon captures the detail of the landscape, the ironies and rhythms of natural speech, the tragic and the marvelous, firsthand, day after day.

Baker
& Taylor

A richly textured, anecdotal portrait of life as a police officer in the NYPD chronicles one man's life as a cop, from growing up with a police officer father and his education at Harvard, to his first day on the beat in the South Bronx and to his rise to detective, capturing the complex life on the street of the city, his law enforcement legacy, and the camraderie of the force. 125,000 first printing.

Publisher: New York : Riverhead Books, 2004
ISBN: 9781573222662
1573222666
Branch Call Number: 363.2092 C761b
Characteristics: 562 p. ; 25 cm

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apollard18
Jun 24, 2012

This book is a great account not only of what police officers do, but also of what motivates police officers, how a department is organized and how politics are inevitably linked to the department. Conlon is a gifted writer and he knows how to write in an informal, even witty, way while choosing his words so carefully that his writing sounds incredibly mature and thoughtful.

http://cafereads.blogspot.com/2012/05/blue-blood.html

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